Blow-By Racing and Nitrous Express Prepare for Coyote Modified

RP0314BBR-LEAD

 

There’s an arm’s race going on out there as racers, Mustang shops, and manufacturers are gearing up for an all-out war in the newly formed DiabloSport Coyote Modified category. As of this writing a tire has yet to be officially turned in this Coyote 5.0L powered eliminator, but the war is scheduled to breakout this March during the 2014 season opening event dubbed the Spring Break Shootout (Bradenton Motorsports Park, March 6-9). The proverbial line in the sand has been carved out between nitrous, supercharger, and turbocharged combinations. It is a class designed for street type power adders but little else in way of engine modification with the power adder ultimately deciding the potential of the popular next generation 5.0L.

Blow-By Racing and Nitrous Express prepare for Coyote Modified with a custom nitrous system.

It all started with a simple Boss 302 intake manifold, which features 12.17-inch long runners and a box plenum. With fuel rails and injectors installed it gave Nitrous Express limited room to custom fit two stages of nitrous.

 

 

One company that has been following this class since its formal announcement last summer is Blow-By Racing. The popular Florida-based speed shop is well versed in just about everything Mustang from the Fox-body craze to the modern magic of the Coyote 5.0L powerplant. As the rules became more solid and specific, so did Blow-By Racing’s decision to put a shop-backed racecar in the class. The company is resurrecting its former heads-up superstar, a 1988 Mustang LX coupe that saw action in Fun Ford Weekend’s Street Warrior category. The rolling chassis was dusted off for another tour of duty in the fierce small-tire wars of Ford drag racing. The drivetrain for Coyote Modified will be totally different but the true stock suspension and SFI-certified roll cage are perfect for the new project.

Blow-By Racing resurrected its former Fun Ford Weekend Street Warrior rolling chassis for its assault on Coyote Modified. Chris Jones will unleash the fury with two stages of nitrous while rolling over the scales at a race weight of 2,900 pounds.

Blow-By Racing resurrected its former Fun Ford Weekend Street Warrior rolling chassis for its assault on Coyote Modified. Chris Jones will unleash the fury with two stages of nitrous while rolling over the scales at a race weight of 2,900 pounds.

The Fox-body provided a solid foundation for eight-second runs and it was time to decide which power-adder would top a heavily massaged Coyote 5.0L powerplant. We’ve heard all sorts of wild accusations and assumptions over the past six months with regards to the power potential for boost and nitrous. A few have taken the plunge into the centrifugal blower ranks while others have looked seriously at the 67mm turbo and the positive displacement packages. As the boosted combinations gain in popularity on the street, a NMRA imposed minimum weight of 2,900 pounds for nitrous entries in Coyote Modified has several racers eying up that package for competition. Chris Jones of Blow-By Racing explained his reason for the lightweight chemically enhanced horsepower, “we liked the weight break for nitrous combos and also the fact there are zero restrictions—no jet size limits, no spec solenoid sizing—pretty much run two stages.”

The finished product is intimidating—two direct port nitrous systems aimed at providing 400-500 hp worth of nitrous for eight-second time slips in NMRA’s newest heads-up eliminator.

The finished product is intimidating—two direct port nitrous systems aimed at providing 400-500 hp worth of nitrous for eight-second time slips in NMRA’s newest heads-up eliminator.

Nozzle placement is important and the gurus in the custom shop at Nitrous Express had to contend with two major variables on the Boss intake. First were the fuel injectors and fuel rails and the other was support ribbing on each runner.

Nozzle placement is important and the gurus in the custom shop at Nitrous Express had to contend with two major variables on the Boss intake. First were the fuel injectors and fuel rails and the other was support ribbing on each runner.

Once the team decided on the proper location, they drilled a hole in each runner.

Once the team decided on the proper location, they drilled a hole in each runner.

Blow-By Racing leveraged its relationship with Nitrous Express for its Coyote Modified combination. The two companies have collaborated on many projects including the shop’s Reaper nitrous package (see side-bar). A Boss 302 intake manifold was shipped off to the skunk works department at Nitrous Express in Texas. Nitrous Express isn’t just a manufacturer of nitrous systems and components as the company runs a custom shop for projects just like this one. We’ve seen plenty of nitrous racers in NMRA competition with custom Nitrous Express setups, including Outlaw badass Sam Vincent. The plan called for the nitrous-oxide scientists to add two stages using two direct-port nitrous systems. A direct-port system features a nozzle in each intake runner to deliver nitrous (and fuel in a wet system) to each cylinder. The BBR intake manifold received two nozzles in each runner since the team decided two stages of nitrous allows them to control the power due to the tire and suspension limitations.

The outside system, which is the primary nitrous hit, features SSV nozzles. The SSV is a stainless steel nozzle with provisions for nitrous and fuel for the wet system. The fitting angle on the nitrous side of the nozzle helps when plumbing the rest of the direct port system.

The outside system, which is the primary nitrous hit, features SSV nozzles. The SSV is a stainless steel nozzle with provisions for nitrous and fuel for the wet system. The fitting angle on the nitrous side of the nozzle helps when plumbing the rest of the direct port system.

Here you can see the nozzle’s tip sticking out in the runner. The nozzle tip is a very important as this is where the nitrous and fuel discharges to form a homogenized mixture.

Here you can see the nozzle’s tip sticking out in the runner. The nozzle tip is a very important as this is where the nitrous and fuel discharges to form a homogenized mixture.

Coyote Modified doesn’t have any restrictions on the solenoid sizes or even the number of solenoids. Nitrous Express used Lightning Stage 6 solenoids with a .093-inch orifice for excellent nitrous flow. The body is CNC-machined to keep it lightweight and Nitrous Express has maximized the flow path to deliver the most horsepower as possible.

Coyote Modified doesn’t have any restrictions on the solenoid sizes or even the number of solenoids. Nitrous Express used Lightning Stage 6 solenoids with a .093-inch orifice for excellent nitrous flow. The body is CNC-machined to keep it lightweight and Nitrous Express has maximized the flow path to deliver the most horsepower as possible.

Adding two sets of nozzles to the Boss 302 intake is not a simple task, this isn’t some sheetmetal intake for a big-block Pro Mod engine—it is a compact intake manifold designed to fit under a stock hood with short-runners and box plenum so the high-tech V-8 could spin easily to 8.000 rpm or more. The Boss 302 intake is one of three manifolds legal for Coyote Modified—the OEM, Boss 302, and Cobra Jet. The mad scientists at Nitrous Express examined the intake to figure out the best course of action to fit two complete direct-ports on the intake manifold. Jones shipped the intake with the Aeromotive fuel rails in place so there were no surprises when it comes time to bolt the intake on the engine.

The solenoid and distribution block are mounted upside down and above the fuel rail. As you can see the aluminum tubes are attached to the outer set of nozzles and the inner set were plumbed shortly after this photo was taken.

The solenoid and distribution block are mounted upside down and above the fuel rail. As you can see the aluminum tubes are attached to the outer set of nozzles and the inner set were plumbed shortly after this photo was taken.

 

The solenoid and distribution block are mounted upside down and above the fuel rail. As you can see the aluminum tubes are attached to the outer set of nozzles and the inner set were plumbed shortly after this photo was taken.

The solenoid and distribution block are mounted upside down and above the fuel rail. As you can see the aluminum tubes are attached to the outer set of nozzles and the inner set were plumbed shortly after this photo was taken.

Ryan Lewis of Nitrous Express explained the tight confines in this application, “the primary stage was little more difficult due to the intake runners having stiffening ridges on the outside of the runner which limited nozzle placement.” The fuel injectors and rails also forced the outer set of nozzles to be installed high in the runner. He continued, “the second stage, which was installed on the underside of the intake, was actually very straightforward. The space between the two banks was tight so we utilized a crisscross plumbing pattern (solenoids on one side and nozzles on the other), which allowed us to keep the lines as short as possible while minimizing the amount of bends in the hard tubing.” It was a tight fit but the finished product looks clean and intimidating.

The bottom side of the manifold is where the second system is installed. Once again the nozzle placement was selected, holes drilled, and nozzles installed.

The bottom side of the manifold is where the second system is installed. Once again the nozzle placement was selected, holes drilled, and nozzles installed.

 

 

A series of custom bent aluminum tubes connect it all together.

A series of custom bent aluminum tubes connect it all together.

There a few factors that weighed in on the Nitrous Express tune-up (which wasn’t available for print, FYI). The first is that both systems are wet meaning that both nitrous and fuel are sprayed into the runners. The second fact about the Blow-By Racing combination is that Jones will be relying on a Big Stuff 3 stand-alone EFI. He is keeping both the engine and the nitrous tuning separate. “Going with the wet system seemed like the safer route. Right now we know we can add two wet kits and run the Big Stuff 3 without any problems. We plan on switching to a dry system once there are more options on the market for the Coyote engine.” We asked Lewis if there were any concerns about combining the low-pressure wet nitrous system and the high-pressure EFI injectors. He responded, “there is no problem feeding the nitrous system with low fuel pressure. All Nitrous Express nozzles are designed to shear the fuel discharge with the nitrous discharge. This shearing effect results in a completely homogenized nitrous and fuel charge, which results in the greatest power gains possible.” He also added that Nitrous Express offers dry nitrous systems for those who prefer that route.

The fuel and nitrous solenoids are tucked under the Boss intake cleanly and mostly out of view.

The fuel and nitrous solenoids are tucked under the Boss intake cleanly and mostly out of view.

As the arms race continues to ramp up, the racers are planning the war to begin shortly after you read this issue. Blow-By Racing has certainly sent a message that they are loaded up with a few stages of nitrous and ready to hang the wheels in this eight-second slugfest.

 

 

Everyone knows that nitrous packs a serious punch and carries the best hp/dollar ratio of any performance component on the market. Nitrous is also a compact and somewhat simple power adder making it easy to hide from prying eyes. Blow-By Racing collaborated with Nitrous Express to design a hidden kit that is a direct bolt-on for 2010 to 2014 Mustang. The single stage kit adds anywhere from 50hp to 125hp at the single push of a button. A Blow-By Racing test vehicle (2013 Mustang GT) was outfitted with the Reaper H/K nitrous system in addition to a JLT cold-air kit, Blow-By Racing off-road X-pipe, Boss 302 intake manifold, and custom Blow-By Racing tune. The biggest setting (125hp) netted a total output of 500 rwhp and 500 rwtq with the gains showing 100 rwhp and 150 rwtq over naturally aspirated trim. But dyno numbers are one thing and the track is where we prefer to chart gains—the test car ran 10.83 at 126 mph while rolling on a set of drag radials. We would like to note that the car also has bolt-on suspension modifications and all performance on the dyno and track were performed with 93 octane pump gas.

Everyone knows that nitrous packs a serious punch and carries the best hp/dollar ratio of any performance component on the market. Nitrous is also a compact and somewhat simple power adder making it easy to hide from prying eyes. Blow-By Racing collaborated with Nitrous Express to design a hidden kit that is a direct bolt-on for 2010 to 2014 Mustang. The single stage kit adds anywhere from 50hp to 125hp at the single push of a button.
A Blow-By Racing test vehicle (2013 Mustang GT) was outfitted with the Reaper H/K nitrous system in addition to a JLT cold-air kit, Blow-By Racing off-road X-pipe, Boss 302 intake manifold, and custom Blow-By Racing tune. The biggest setting (125hp) netted a total output of 500 rwhp and 500 rwtq with the gains showing 100 rwhp and 150 rwtq over naturally aspirated trim. But dyno numbers are one thing and the track is where we prefer to chart gains—the test car ran 10.83 at 126 mph while rolling on a set of drag radials. We would like to note that the car also has bolt-on suspension modifications and all performance on the dyno and track were performed with 93 octane pump gas.

 

For more info of on this setup or anything else in the Blow-By Racing line up, call 561.417.5555.

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